The End Of Butterfly Season

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We took another butterfly hike yesterday. This is the last one of the season. The reality is that with the recent frost, and cooler temperatures, there are not many left. It is the end of butterfly season here in this part of Ohio.

This is a Pieris rapae, small white, or cabbage white butterfly. A very common, small- to medium-sized butterfly that I am sure you have seen in your flower bed or back yard.

The next butterfly hike (or walk) will be next spring. I can’t wait:).

~ Rick


Rick’s latest technology muse:

Check out our vlog, which includes more pictures and video on YouTube at tales.photos. Remember to subscribe!

Prints are available for many of the photos on this site on canvas, metal or glass. They are stunning and you can purchase them for a wall at home. Click the link or the ‘prints and such’ tab.

©2019 Rick Cartwright

Lost A Wood Duck

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Teresa captured this photo of this Wood Duck while I was flying my drone. I took my larger lens over to try and get a photo with more resolution, but lost the duck somewhere. That happens. This is a good shot considering the distance and crop.

Wikipedia has this to say about the Wood Duck:

"Their breeding habitat is wooded swamps, shallow lakes, marshes or ponds, and creeks in eastern North America, the west coast of the United States and western Mexico. They usually nest in cavities in trees close to water, although they will take advantage of nesting boxes in wetland locations. Females line their nests with feathers and other soft materials, and the elevation provides some protection from predators.[5] Unlike most other ducks, the wood duck has sharp claws for perching in trees and can, in southern regions, produce two broods in a single season—the only North American duck that can do so."

"Females typically lay between 7 and 15 white-tan eggs that incubate for an average of 30 days.[4] However, if nesting boxes are placed too close together, females may lay eggs in the nests of their neighbours, which may lead to nests which may contain as many as 30 eggs and unsuccessful incubation, a behaviour known as "nest dumping."

"After hatching, the ducklings climb to the opening of the nest cavity, jump down from the nest tree and make their way to water. The mother calls them to her, but does not help them in any way. They prefer nesting over water so the young have a soft landing, but will nest up to 140 m (460 ft) away from the shoreline. The day after they hatch, the young climb to the nest entrance and jump to the ground. The ducklings can swim and find their own food by this time."

These birds feed by dabbling or walking on land. Dabbling means to search for food from the surface of the water, as opposed to diving underneath the surface to scavenge for food. They mainly eat berries, acorns, and seeds, but also insects, making them omnivores.

~ Rick


Rick’s latest technology muse:

Check out our vlog, which includes more pictures and video on YouTube at [tales.photos][1]. Remember to subscribe!

[Prints are available][2] for many of the photos on this site on canvas, metal or glass. They are stunning and you can purchase them for a wall at home. Click the link or the ‘prints and such’ tab.

©2019 Rick Cartwright

Caught In A Web

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This leave did not make it to the ground. I guess some spider or maybe a couple of them have been busy.

I hope to get out a few times this week and make at least one video of the colors. The leaves are starting to really change and put on their fall colors. We will see.

~ Rick


Rick’s latest technology muse:

Check out our vlog, which includes more pictures and video on YouTube at tales.photos. Remember to subscribe!

Prints are available for many of the photos on this site on canvas, metal or glass. They are stunning and you can purchase them for a wall at home. Click the link or the ‘prints and such’ tab.

©2019 Rick Cartwright

Hey, I Was Here First

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I captured this photo while Teresa and I were hiking near the Stillwater River this week. It is not the first time we have seen mulitple insects on the same plant, but it is always intersting.

Nature is full of surprises. Every hike brings new and special experiences. Some can be captured in a photo. Life is good.

~ Rick


Rick’s latest technology muse:

Check out our vlog, which includes more pictures and video on YouTube at tales.photos. Remember to subscribe!

Prints are available for many of the photos on this site on canvas, metal or glass. They are stunning and you can purchase them for a wall at home. Click the link or the ‘prints and such’ tab.

©2019 Rick Cartwright

What If …

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Teresa and I hiked at Stillwater Prairie Reserve this week. I shot these photos with my drone. As you can see, especially in the second photo, we are starting to see some color. Its still late this year. I have noticed the walnut trees have lost their leaves, but most of the trees are still green.

On a different topic: I am not trying to make a political statement with this story. Clearly, by the number there has been a decline in some bird species. This is a sad read: Climate change threatens hundreds of North American bird species with extinction, study says.

So, what do the photos have to do with this issue? The migration is almost complete. I saw a few birds, but mostly of the non-migratory variety. It was so quiet. It made me think, what if it was like this year around .. and the birds of summer were not around. That would be sad.

~ Rick


Rick’s latest technology muse:

Check out our vlog, which includes more pictures and video on YouTube at tales.photos. Remember to subscribe!

Prints are available for many of the photos on this site on canvas, metal or glass. They are stunning and you can purchase them for a wall at home. Click the link or the ‘prints and such’ tab.

©2019 Rick Cartwright